Celymar& Drew

Battle of Midway.
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Yamamoto Isoroku

The Japanese Admiral Yamamoto Isoroku and planned the attack on Pearl Harbor and hoped to destroy the remains of the United States Pacific fleet. He hoped to lure them into battle near Midway Island. Midway island is 1,100 miles away from Hawaii. Yamamoto commited most of his navy to his planned attack of Midway. Yamamoto believed that American Admiral Chester Nimitz would use all of his resources to protect the island that was very important to Hawaii's defense.

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Map of the Battle of Midway

The battle of Midway began at 4:30 am on June 4th, 1942, six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The base at Midway, even though damaged by the Japanese attack remained operational and later became a very important factor in American trans-Pacific offensive. 240 miles northwest of Midway, Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo's four carriers began launching 108 planes to attack the U.S. base. Three U.S carriers were steaming 215 miles to the east which was unknown to the Japanese. The Japanese attacked two Midway inhabited islands at 6:30 am. Twenty minutes of bombing destroyed some facilities on Eastern Island but did not disable the airfield.

When the Aviators were flying back from Midway, the Japanese carriers recieved many counter attacks from Midways own planes. Soon after 7:00, torpedo attacks were made by six navy and four army air forces. Between 7:55 and 8:20 two groups of marine Corps bombers and a formation of army planes came in. Meanwhile, a tardy Japanese scout plane had spotted the U.S fleet and, just as Midway's counterattacks were ending, reported the presence of a carriers. The Japanese Commander Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo was getting ready to send the second group of planes for another attack on Midway. In the hour after about 0930, U.S. Navy planes from the carriers Hornet, Enterprise and Yorktown made a series of attacks, initially by three squadrons of torpedo planes that, despite nearly total losses, made no hits. Of the once-overwhelming Japanese carrier force, only Hiryu remained operational. A few hours later,some planes crippled such as USS Yorktown. By the end of the day, though, U.S. carrier planes found and bombed Hiryu.


Video:

Battle of Midway

Pictures
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Japanese planes attacking an american aircraft carrier during the Battle of Midway.

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Midway Islands